CoSN2021 Goes Virtual – New Registration Structure Encourages Team Participation

Washington, DC

CoSN’s Board of Directors has approved moving CoSN2021 to an entirely virtual conference in 2021. Originally scheduled as a face-to-face event March 1-4 in Austin, TX, the conference dates will shift to March 2-4, 2021.  Base registration rates for CoSN members are 40% less than base registration fees would have been for a face-to-face event.  Additionally, the new registration rates are tiered by school system size to allow the entire edtech team members to attend. CoSN member school systems range from small (under 2,500) to medium size (2,501) to large (10,001-50,000).  Any district with more than 50,000 student is mega-large.  As an example, a small district paying what is the equivalent price of two registrations, the new registration structure allows them to send an unlimited number of others for no additional cost.  Similarly, a mega-large district can now send their entire district technology leadership team for the equivalent cost of ten registrations. 

CoSN’s Board of Directors and Conference Co-Chairs are committed to delivering the same high quality content as always.   We are excited about the opportunity to explore new ways to delivering that content in a virtual setting.  Innovative delivery and networking experiences are first and foremost a key part of our conference strategy,” said Steve Langford, Conference Co-Chair and incoming Chair of CoSN’s Board of Directors. CIO Beaverton School District (OR).

“In a time when funding for professional learning is low or is being cut, CoSN’s new pricing structure will allow districts to get more for their money and have a greater reach. I hope that many school systems will take advantage of the opportunity to offer this outstanding professional development opportunity beyond their CTO to the leadership teams” said Marlo Gaddis, CETL, Conference Co-chair, Secretary of CoSN’s Board of Directors and CTO Wake County Public Schools (NC)

“It is our hope that with the reduced pricing and elimination of any travel costs, school systems who have not had the funds to attend past conference can take advantage of the opportunity to access up-to-the-minute content and networking opportunities.   We are excited to be able to explore new opportunities to deliver content, but also to make those member-to-member connections happen!”, said CoSN CEO Keith Krueger.

Plans for CoSN2022 remain as a face-to-face conference in Nashville, TN with a return to Austin, TX in 2023.

CoSN: Heidi Payter, hpayter@fratelli.com, 202-822-9491

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.